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Multilingual Demographic Dictionary, second unified edition, English volume

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Multilingual Demographic Dictionary, second unified edition, English vol.
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The harmonization of all the second editions of the Multilingual Demographic Dictionary is an ongoing process. Please consult the discussion area of this page for further comments.


Go to: Introduction to Demopædia | Instructions on use | Downloads
Chapters: Preface | 1. General concepts | 2. The treatment and processing of population statistics | 3. Distribution and classification of the population | 4. Mortality and morbidity | 5. Nuptiality | 6. Fertility | 7. Population growth and replacement | 8. Spatial mobility | 9. Economic and social aspects of demography
Pages: 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 80 | 81 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93
Index: Global Index | Index of chapter 1 | Index of chapter 2 | Index of chapter 3 | Index of chapter 4 | Index of chapter 5 | Index of chapter 6 | Index of chapter 7 | Index of chapter 8 | Index of chapter 9


210

Census operations 1 usually begin with the delimitation of census areas 2 and enumeration districts 3. Enumeration districts in towns and cities may consist of one or several blocks 4, a block being defined as a group of buildings around which it is possible to walk without crossing a street, or which are bounded by some obstacle, such as a railway line or a river. Most of the larger cities of several countries have been subdivided into statistical areas called census tracts 5 which may contain one or several enumeration districts.

211

Vital events 1 may be defined as births, deaths, stillbirths, foetal deaths, marriages, adoptions, legitimations, recognitions, annulments, divorces and separations; in short all the events which have to do with an individual’s entrance into or departure from life together with changes in civil status 2. Records of these events are generally called vital records 3, or registration records 3. For legal reasons vital events have, in many countries, long been the object of vital registration 4 or civil registration 4. Birth registration 5, marriage registration 7 and death registration 9 use special forms as birth records 6, marriage records 8 and death records 10; these are the most common types of registration documents. The person responsible for maintaining these registers is called the registrar 11.

  • 4. Register, n. - register, v. - registration, n.
    Civil registration systems are the descendents of registers (214-1) kept by religious groups. A register was originally a bound book in which one or several lines were devoted to an event Today individual records often take the form of certificates. They are separate documents for each recorded vital event.

212

Vital statistics 1 or registration statistics 1 are obtained by processing the registration record or a statistical report 2 established at the time of registration. Tabulations by place of residence 3 of the mother or of the decedent are often regarded as more useful for demographic purposes than tabulations by place of occurrence.

  • 3. In many countries, the time of registration of a birth may be markedly later than the time of occurrence.

213

The registers mentioned in a preceding paragraph (cf. 211-4) are distinct from the population registers 1 of those countries which possess a system of continuous registration 2. In these registers every member of the population or every family may be represented by a card 3, and the register is maintained 4 or updated 4 through information which reaches it through the local registration offices and through registration of any changes of residence 5 (cf. 310-6). It is usually matched 6 with the census results and brought up to date at regular intervals by special checks 7.

  • 3. A card file is a collection of cards. In general, a file is a collection of records arranged in convenient order.

214

Historical demography (102-1) often uses documents which precede or anticipate the development of civil registration (211-4) and nominal lists (207-3) from censuses. Parish registers 1 or parochial registers 1 contain information on the religious close equivalents of vital events such as baptisms 2, religious marriages (503-2), and burials 3. For chrisoms 5, privately baptized infants 4★ who die at home prior to a formal church ceremony, only the burial record is available. Nominal lists contain information either on a portion of the population or more rarely on the whole population. They include the a status animarum 6 which are nominal lists of all parishioners, lists of communicants 7 and confirmation lists 8, as well as administrative and fiscal documents such as hearth tax lists 9, taxation rolls 10 and military conscription lists 11.

215

Data are extracted from parish registers with the help of several types of event forms 1 or slips 1 . These include the baptism form 2, marriage form 3 and burial form 4. The names of the persons of record 5 (i.e. the persons being baptized, buried or getting married) are inscribed on these forms, and information is recorded about the parents and other persons such as the godfather 6, the godmother 7 and the witnesses 8. Other anonymous rolls 9★, nominal rolls 10★ and transcription sheets 11 are also used for summary extraction of the data, either with or without the names of the subjects. Family reconstitution (638-2) makes use of family forms (638-1). Extant family histories or genealogies 12 that reconstitute the descendants of an individual or a family are, under certain conditions, a valuable source of information on the demographic characteristics of the selected families.

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Go to: Introduction to Demopædia | Instructions on use | Downloads
Chapters: Preface | 1. General concepts | 2. The treatment and processing of population statistics | 3. Distribution and classification of the population | 4. Mortality and morbidity | 5. Nuptiality | 6. Fertility | 7. Population growth and replacement | 8. Spatial mobility | 9. Economic and social aspects of demography
Pages: 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 80 | 81 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93
Index: Global Index | Index of chapter 1 | Index of chapter 2 | Index of chapter 3 | Index of chapter 4 | Index of chapter 5 | Index of chapter 6 | Index of chapter 7 | Index of chapter 8 | Index of chapter 9