The Demopaedia team will be present at the next International Population Conference in Busan.
If you attend the conference, please, come to our oral communication which will be held on Tuesday August 27, from 15:30 to 17:00 (Bexco, room 213). The new Korean dictionary will also be presented in a side meeting organized by the Planned Population Federation of Korea (PPFK) on "Population Issues & Official development assistance" (open to all) at 19:00 (Bexco, room 110).

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Disclaimer : The sponsors of Demopaedia do not necessarily agree with all the definitions contained in this version of the Dictionary.

The harmonization of all the second editions of the Multilingual Demographic Dictionary is an ongoing process. Please consult the discussion area of this page for further comments.


Go to: Introduction to Demopædia | Instructions on use | Downloads
Chapters: Preface | 1. General concepts | 2. The treatment and processing of population statistics | 3. Distribution and classification of the population | 4. Mortality and morbidity | 5. Nuptiality | 6. Fertility | 7. Population growth and replacement | 8. Spatial mobility | 9. Economic and social aspects of demography
Pages: 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 80 | 81 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93
Index: Global Index | Index of chapter 1 | Index of chapter 2 | Index of chapter 3 | Index of chapter 4 | Index of chapter 5 | Index of chapter 6 | Index of chapter 7 | Index of chapter 8 | Index of chapter 9


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In census practice a distinction is made between the resident population 1 or de jure population 1 of a given area, which consists of the people who habitually live in that area, and the actual population 2, or de facto population 2, which is made up of the persons in the area on census day. In the resident population, temporary absentees 4 are included with those permanent residents 3 who are present in the area on census day; the actual population consists of residents together with visitors 5 or transients 5. The two methods of enumeration will give different results even for the country as a whole. The place where a person lives is called the place of residence 6. For administrative reasons, certain persons who live together in large communities (i.e. boarding schools, military persons in barracks, prisoners, etc. (cf. 110-5*) are often separately enumerated. These persons form the institutional population 7. Special rules are used to enumerate homeless 8 or persons of no fixed abode 8.

  • 6. The term domicile is a technical legal term for legal residence and denotes the place where a person is legally deemed to reside. This may differ from his actual residence. In the United States of America, the de jure population is the population of usual residence.
  • 7. In the United States of America the term institutional inmates is reserved for persons living under care or custody in correctional institutions, hospitals for mental disease and tuberculosis, homes for the aged, handicapped and dependent or neglected persons; other residents of group quarters include such persons as students in college dormitories, or soldiers in military barracks.

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In many countries a rural area 1 is defined as an administrative district in which the population size is below a certain level (often taken as 2,000). Other areas are called urban areas 2. The rural population 3 is the population living in rural areas, the urban population 4 that living in urban areas. Criteria for allocating the population of particular areas to the rural or urban sector respectively differ in different countries. Certain definitions of rural and urban population may lead to distinguish an intermediate category referred to as the semi-urban population 5.

  • 3. Rural, adj. - realization, n.: growth in the proportion of persons living in rural areas.
    Rural population should not be confused with agricultural population or farm population (359-2).
  • 4. Urban, adj. - urbanization, n.: growth in the proportion of persons living in urban areas.

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The density of population 1 or population density 1 is an index showing the relation between a population and the area in which it lives. The simplest density index 2 is obtained by dividing the total population by the area of the territory and is generally expressed as the number of persons per acre, square kilometre or square mile. The scatter of the population 3 depends on the type of settlement 4, grouped settlement 5 or dispersed settlement 6. Some writers have computed the population center 7 of a given area by the methods used to find the center of gravity in applied mathematics; each individual in the population is given an equal weight.

  • 1. Density, n. - dense, adj.

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Where the pattern of settlement of different populations is to be compared and other factors besides surface area are taken into account, comparative density indices 1 are sometimes computed. There are various such indices, among which we may mention the density of population per unit of cultivable area 2 and the density of the agricultural population per unit of cultivable area 3. Occasionally these indices are based on the cultivated area 4 rather than the cultivable area 5. The density may also be expressed as a relation between population and total economic resources; the maximum potential density 6 or population carrying capacity 6, showing the relationship between resources and the maximum population that can be supported with these resources, may be considered. The concept of optimum density 7, i.e., the density which will give the maximum real income per head with given resources, is used in population theory.

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Go to: Introduction to Demopædia | Instructions on use | Downloads
Chapters: Preface | 1. General concepts | 2. The treatment and processing of population statistics | 3. Distribution and classification of the population | 4. Mortality and morbidity | 5. Nuptiality | 6. Fertility | 7. Population growth and replacement | 8. Spatial mobility | 9. Economic and social aspects of demography
Pages: 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 80 | 81 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93
Index: Global Index | Index of chapter 1 | Index of chapter 2 | Index of chapter 3 | Index of chapter 4 | Index of chapter 5 | Index of chapter 6 | Index of chapter 7 | Index of chapter 8 | Index of chapter 9