The Demopaedia team will be present at the next International Population Conference in Busan.
If you attend the conference, please, come to our oral communication which will be held on Tuesday August 27, from 15:30 to 17:00 (Bexco, room 213). The new Korean dictionary will also be presented in a side meeting organized by the Planned Population Federation of Korea (PPFK) on "Population Issues & Official development assistance" (open to all) at 19:00 (Bexco, room 110).

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Disclaimer : The sponsors of Demopaedia do not necessarily agree with all the definitions contained in this version of the Dictionary.

The harmonization of all the second editions of the Multilingual Demographic Dictionary is an ongoing process. Please consult the discussion area of this page for further comments.


Go to: Introduction to Demopædia | Instructions on use | Downloads
Chapters: Preface | 1. General concepts | 2. The treatment and processing of population statistics | 3. Distribution and classification of the population | 4. Mortality and morbidity | 5. Nuptiality | 6. Fertility | 7. Population growth and replacement | 8. Spatial mobility | 9. Economic and social aspects of demography
Pages: 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 80 | 81 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93
Index: Global Index | Index of chapter 1 | Index of chapter 2 | Index of chapter 3 | Index of chapter 4 | Index of chapter 5 | Index of chapter 6 | Index of chapter 7 | Index of chapter 8 | Index of chapter 9


930

A population policy (105-2) is a series of measures taken by public authorities to influence the trend of population change, or principles offered as a basis for such measures. A distinction is made between populationist 1 policies designed to increase the population, to accelerate its rate of growth or to check actual or incipient population decline or depopulation 2, and population control 3 policies for the purpose of checking population growth or reducing the rate of population increase. Among the former, pronatalist 4 policies, which attempt to increase the birth rate (332-1), are particularly important. In contrast to pronatalist policies, there are antinatalist 5 policies, which are designed to reduce the frequency of births. Population policy may also include a component of population redistribution 6 policy designed to influence the territorial distribution of population, as well as a component of migration policy 7★. Health policy 8★, which aims to reduce morbidity (420-1) and mortality (401-1), is an other component of population policy.

  • 3. Also called Malthusian policies. See 906-1.

931

In many countries allowances 1, benefits 1 or grants 2 are given to the parents of children. In general an allowance is a sum of money which is paid periodically, whereas a grant is paid on a single occasion only. Family allowance 3 or children’s allowance 3 denotes a sum of money paid regularly to parents with a specified number of children. In many fiscal systems, tax rebates 4 are granted in respect of dependent children. Other monetary benefits paid in some countries include maternity grants 5 or birth grants 5 which are paid upon the birth of a child, pre-natal allowances 6 paid to expectant mothers during pregnancy, and on occasion marriage loans 7 granted to newly-married couples in order to assist them in setting up a household.

932

Many other public measures, such as housing programs or measures in the field of public health 1, may have an impact on demographic phenomena. The provision of services for pregnant women such as pre-natal clinics 2 and for parturient (603-4*) women may help in reducing late foetal, infant and maternal mortality (cf. 410, 411, 413, and 424-5). Services which are primarily designed to help the mother are called maternity services 3; those meant to assist the child are infant welfare services 4 or child welfare services 4.

933

Population programs 1 designed to reduce fertility in developing countries have included family-planning education 2 and family-planning services 3, either alone or in association with health programs 4 and social welfare programs 5, particularly maternal and child health programs 6 designed to reduce mortality. Some countries have attempted to resort to incentives 7 and disincentives 8 of various kinds to elicit the motivation to use family limitation; social pressures 9 and legal sanctions 10 against disapproved fertility behavior are also encountered. The English term "Population Education 11★" is used untranslated in some countries, especially Germany. In this specific context, it refers to the dissemination of information (in schools and other contexts) about the impact of individual reproductive behavior on broader society.

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Go to: Introduction to Demopædia | Instructions on use | Downloads
Chapters: Preface | 1. General concepts | 2. The treatment and processing of population statistics | 3. Distribution and classification of the population | 4. Mortality and morbidity | 5. Nuptiality | 6. Fertility | 7. Population growth and replacement | 8. Spatial mobility | 9. Economic and social aspects of demography
Pages: 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 50 | 51 | 52 | 60 | 61 | 62 | 63 | 70 | 71 | 72 | 73 | 80 | 81 | 90 | 91 | 92 | 93
Index: Global Index | Index of chapter 1 | Index of chapter 2 | Index of chapter 3 | Index of chapter 4 | Index of chapter 5 | Index of chapter 6 | Index of chapter 7 | Index of chapter 8 | Index of chapter 9